Resources for parents, family members and the community

The Charles County Department of Social Services has provided links to helpful online resources.

Comprehensive info on parenting, stress management in times of crisis, links to partners and other resources:

www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/mental-health-and-coping/index.html

preventchildabuse.org/coronavirus-resources/

www.apa.org/topics/covid-19/domestic-violence-child-abuse

If you or a loved one is having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or dial 911. The Maryland Psychological Association is available: Stefanie Reeves, CAE — executive director, 10480 Little Patuxent Parkway, #910, Columbia, MD 21044, phone: 410-992-4258.

For those affected by mental illness, the National Association on Metal Illness provide COVID-19 resources at www.nami.org/getattachment/About-NAMI/NAMI-News/2020/NAMI-Updates-on-the-Coronavirus/COVID-19-Updated-Guide-1.pdf.

Visit 211.org or call “211” for a free and confidential service to help find local resources 24/7 for a range of services, including mental health support, finding food, paying for housing, accessing free childcare or other essential services.

For intimate partner violence and child abuse practical tips for a safety plan go to: www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/happiness-is-state-mind/202004/intimate-partner-violence-and-child-abuse-during-covid-19.

Tips and guidance for families; keep your child learning; pregnancy amid COVID19 and more: www.unicef.org/coronavirus/covid-19#COVID-19-explainers.

Share the Charles County Department of Social Services Abuse Hotline number — 301-392-6724 — with friends and family through text, phone calls and social media.

Ask your child if they have checked in with friends and classmates. Allow children to express if they have concerns about their friends. Be responsive to those remarks without overreacting.

Parents should be watchful while children are participating in online educational platforms to see if any of the children online have cuts or bruises, or appear disheveled.

Neighborhood children outside may seem disengaged, lonely or present physical evidence of abuse. If you note these red flags, safely engage in a conversation, ask if the child needs anything, if they are hungry, if they feel okay and safe, and how school is going.

Mandated reporters are required by law to report suspected child abuse, but anyone can make a good faith report. You do not have to be absolutely certain of abuse or neglect. You need only have reasonable suspicion.

Twitter: @JamieACIndyNews

Twitter: @JamieACIndyNews

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