ELKTON – This past Wednesday we celebrated another Veteran’s Day as we paid tribute to all of the men and women, past and present who have served our country. Our Doughboy Memorial in Elkton reminds us specifically of the seventeen men from Cecil County who lost their lives during WWI. However, these men are more than just names on a plaque – here are short biographies of each of them as a tribute to their ultimate sacrifice.

William Bowie — Born on March 26, 1893 in New Market (Frederick County), Bowie was the son of John and Mary. He was an African American man, who was of short height, a stout build, with black hair and brown eyes. He listed that he was 23, single, and was working for a private family in Chesapeake City. Bowie never made it to France. He died at Camp Meade on October 2, 1918 from pneumonia. He was 25 years old.

George Clark – The son of William Clark, he was born on May 2, 1893 in Marley Mills. He was a white man, of medium height, medium build, with brown hair and brown eyes. He listed that he was 24, single, and was working as a laborer in the Radnor Pulp Mill in Elkton owned by William Singerly. Clark was killed in action on October 14, 1918 in the Centre Sector of Meuse-Argonne, France. He was 25 years old. Clark was buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial in France.

Clarence Cole – Born on November 27, 1895 in Perryville, Cole was the son of Clarence and Carrie. He was a white man, of medium height, medium build, with dark brown hair and grey eyes. At the time of his enlistment, he was 21, single, and was working as a stenographer and recorder of deeds in Elkton. Cole died on October 7, 1918 as a result of wounds he suffered while in the Avocourt Sector of Meuse-Argonne, France. He was 25 years old.

Thomas Cooper – The son of Charles and Mary, Cooper was born on September 27, 1895 in Charlestown. He was a white man, of medium height, medium build, with dark brown hair and dark brown eyes. He was 21, single, and was working as a farmer at the time of his enlistment. Cooper was killed in action on September 26, 1918 while in the Avocourt Sector of Meuse-Argonne, France. It was the day before his 23rd birthday. He was buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial in France.

Mauldin Dennis – Born on March 16, 1891 in North East, Mauldin was the son of John and Laura. He was a white man, of medium height, a stout build, with light brown hair and dark brown eyes. He was listed as 27, single, and working for the railroad doing signal maintenance under the Penna Maryland Division out of Wilmington Delaware. Mauldin was killed in action on September 26, 1918 while in Avocourt Sector; Meuse-Argonne, France.

Raymond Goodnow – The son of Edward and Gertrude, Goodnow was born on March 25, 1890 in North East. He was a white man, tall and stout with gray eyes and light-colored hair. He was listed as 28, single, and working as a laborer. Goodnow never made it to Europe. He died of pneumonia at Camp Meade on September 30, 1918. He was buried at Rosebank Cemetery.

John Hager – Born on February 10, 1899 in Chesapeake City, Hager was the son of Henry and Mary. Although we do not have access to his draft card and do not know much about him, we do know that Hager was a white man who was residing in Chesapeake City at the time. He was killed in action on October 17, 1918 in the Centre Sector of Meuse-Argonne, France. He was 19 years old.

Benjamin Harlan – Born on March 4, 1888 in North East, Harlan was the son of Francis and Mary. He was a white man, tall, and of stout build, with red hair and brown eyes. He listed that he was 29, single, and was working for the railroad as a section hand out of Wilmington Delaware. Harlan died on October 13, 1918 from wounds he suffered while fighting in the Centre Sector of Meuse-Argonne, France. He was 30 years old and was buried at St. Mary Anne’s Cemetery.

Eugene Hevlow – The son of Ruben and Annie, Hevlow was born on May 25, 1893 in Chesapeake City. He was a white man, short with a stout build, light hair and blue eyes. He listed that he was 24, single, and working as a dredger with the C & D Canal Company. Hevlow was killed in action on September 12, 1918 in Baccarat Sector; Esperance-Sousin Sector; Champagne-Marne; Aisne-Marne; St. Mihiel France. He was 25 years old and was buried at Bethel Cemetery.

Willis Jackson – Born on August 15, 1893 in Port Deposit, Jackson was the son of James and Lenora. He was a white man of medium height and medium weight with gray eyes and dark brown hair. He listed that he was 23, single, and was working as a motorman for the railroad out of Chester, PA. Jackson was killed in action on September 26, 1918 in Montfaucon, France. He was 25 years old and was buried at Hopewell Methodist Cemetery.

Earl Kelley – The son of William and Flora, Kelley was born on July 28, 1895 in Rising Sun. He was a white man, tall and slender, with brown eyes and dark brown hair. He listed that he was 21, single, and living in Elkton at the time. He was working as a paper maker at the Jessup & Moore Paper Co. in Providence. Kelley was killed in action on November 4, 1918 in Meuse-Argonne, France. He was 23 years old and was buried at Brookview Cemetery.

Ellis Mahan – Born on July 30, 1892 in Elkton, Mahan was the son of Walter and Rebecca. He was a white man, tall and slender, with gray eyes and blonde hair. At the time, he listed that he was 24, single, and was self-employed as a painter. Mahan was killed in action on October 16, 1918 in Meuse-Argonne, France. He was 26 years old. Unfortunately, it is unknown where he was buried.

George Mercer – Born on November 6, 1896 in St. Augustine, Mercer was the son of Thomas and Fannie. He was an African American man, short in height, with a stout build, dark brown eyes and dark brown hair. He listed that he was 21, single, and living in Chesapeake City. At the time, he was working for a private family as a farm laborer. Mercer never made it to Europe. He died of pneumonia on September 26, 1918 while stationed at Camp Dix in New Jersey. He was 21 years old and was buried at Bohemia Manor Cemetery.

Phineas Peterson — The son of John and Jane, he was born on February 11, 1891 in Fair Hill. He was a white man, short with a slender build, light blue eyes and brown hair. At the time, he listed that he was 26, single, and living in Elkton at the time. He was working as a carpenter for a man named Clifford Willis out of Newark, DE. Peterson died of Broncho Pneumonia while overseas on October 8, 1918. He was 26 years old and was buried at Cherry Hill Methodist Cemetery.

Milton Scarborough — Born in September of 1891 (exact date unknown) in Providence, Scarborough was the son of Caleb and Ida. Although we do not have access to his military draft card, we do know that Scarborough was a white man who was residing in Ohio at the time of his enlistment. He served and fought overseas from October 29, 1917 until his death. Scarborough was actually the first of the seventeen men from Cecil County to be killed in action during the war. He died on May 13, 1918 in France. He was 26 years old and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

William Slicher — Born on February 11, 1895 in Chesapeake City. The son of Andrew and Lena, Slicher was born on February 11, 1895. He was a white man of medium height and medium weight with brown eyes and brown hair. At the time, he listed that he was 22, single, and living in Baltimore. He was working as a boilermaker for the B&O Railroad. Slicher was killed in action on September 26, 1918 in Acocourt Sector, Meuse-Argonne France. He was 23 years old and was buried at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial in France.

Arthur Todd — The son of Lewis and Pamela, Todd was born on July 3, 1897 in Port Deposit. Although we do not have access to his military draft card, we do know that Todd was a white man who was residing in Port Deposit at the time of his enlistment. He never made it to France. Todd died of Lobar Pneumonia on May 5, 1918 while stationed at Camp McClellan in Alabama. He was 20 years old and was buried at West Nottingham Presbyterian Cemetery.

If you recognize one of these men as a relative and have additional information that you would like to share about their lives, please contact me directly at veronica.naujokas@gmail.com.

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